Dog Exercise

Posted by in Blog on January 7, 2018 0 comments

Some daily activity and exercise is essential, allowing freedom to move about in a natural manner.

Lack of exercise leads to poor muscle tone, obesity, heart ailments, bone disorders and often results in emotional problems and dog behavior quirks.

Dogs with no exercise subjected to overcrowding and confinement in cages for prolonged periods, often their entire lives, develop a great variety of physical and emotional disorders.

An exercised dog may rest more calmly at home and be less nervous when left alone. Exercise can improve dogs bone and joint health, heart, and lung function.

Exercise makes show dogs look better and feel better to a judge’s exploring hands. (Because a happy dog looks more gorgeous).

The best exercise channels the activity of both mind and body. Some people believe that dogs need a big garden so they can get plenty of exercise.

The truth is that most dogs do not exercise when they are outdoors by themselves; they spend most of their time laying in the shadow and waiting for “their people” to play with them.

You do not need to take up marathon running in order to adequately exercise your dog.Make your walks interesting.

Let your dog carry a box, a basket, or a toy while walking. Let your dog jump or balance over a tree, hide his toys, hide yourself, and most important – let him play with other dogs! Open the leash when another dog approaches, to prevent “leash-aggression”.

(Don’t worry, they will not kill each other). A dog that tries to “guard” against all strangers is neither happy nor likely to live out a full lifespan. Help your dog learn to enjoy other dogs and people.

Teach your dog to retrieve. A dog who retrieves is easy to exercise. But throw the toy rather far than high.

Jumping high in the air to chase it and landing awkwardly may lead to serious knee injuries.Some games to playFIND ITThis one is great fun for the dog.

Show your dog a treat or his favorite toy, and then place it out of his sight but easily accessible in a dark room.

Tell him to SEEK – his success you will praise enthusiastically. Obviously, the rewards for the dog are multiple – he gets a treat or finds his toy plus a very happy handler.

If using a toy, be sure to reward his find with some play before starting again.You can increase the difficulty of FIND IT by hiding the dogs treats in less accessible places, like in a shoe, or on a low shelf. This can be practiced indoors as well as anywhere else!Alternative exercise:Tunnel exercise – Make a tunnel or maze with some old cardboard boxes or chairs and encourage your dog to explore and go through it.

Concentration exercise – Hide some treats inside an old wash-glove or in a rolled up towel, this is fun for your dog!Brain exercise – Turnover a bowl and hide the treats under it.

Doggie must use his creativity to turn the bowl and get all treats. That is exciting exercise!